O-DOUB -No Good People

S. M. W. -OnOne

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Barely lifting an eyebrow from behind the cash register, the attendant, a former high school teacher yelled, “Get out of here, you’re no good people” and ‘NGP’ was born.   O-Doub was one of those young men that took ownership of that title and made that store clerk eat his words.   No Good People, or NGP, is a unique group made up of two sets of brothers of Irish and Italian descent, Stress, Sean Strange, Raida and O-Doub were all raised in the Richmond Hill section of Queens, New York,  though they did not meet until moving to Long Island and ending up in the same high school.   For those of you not familiar with O-Doub, he is one quarter of the hip hop quartet ‘NGP’ who alongside his group and alone as a solo artist is making waves in the hip hop scene, winning the $5,000.00 Grand Prize for “Best Song” on OurStage.com for their hit single “Chug”.

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In addition, NGP was selected for the “Original Sessions National Band Search” competition, in which they advanced to the finals.  In 2006, NGP signed with Intelligent Music Entertainment, Inc., a label founded and owned by Bob Celestin, a prominent entertainment attorney/manager known for working with artists such as Mary J. Blige, Diddy, Petey Pablo, City High and others.  O-Doub, alongside his NGP brothers, have opened for international acts such as EPMD, Necro,  Ill Bill, Jedi Mind Tricks, Saigon, Sabac Red, Mr. Hyde, DJ Premier, Bizzare of D12, Havoc of Mobb Deep, Joe Buddon, and Immortal Technique to name a few.  They have toured the world, with over 50+ NYC venues under his belt, as well as Hollywood, Canada, Germany, France, Switzerland, England and Denmark.   NGP’s 2008 single “Ez Lover”, borrowed from Phil Collins’ 80’s mega hit “Easy Lover”, is a Top 40/Rhythmic club smash that features the groups humorous take on being “Casanovas”. The track gained nationwide recognition and received thousands of BDS reported spins and helped the group reach a higher status in the music industry. The song was so heavily requested on WDRE-FM (Party 105 – Long Island/Hamptons), that NGP was invited to perform at Party 105’s MEGAJAM concert with established acts such as Fat Joe, Michelle Williams (Destiny’s Child), Pitbull, Lady Gaga, Naughty by Nature and others. 2008 was also the year NGP was selected to URB magazine’s “Next 1000” as well as being nominated for “Best Rap Group” at the 2008 Underground Music Awards and also made an appearance on BET’s “Rap City” in their “Spit Yo Game” segment.  Speaking to and for their generation, O-Doub and NGP have perfected their craft with hard hitting one-liners, tight rhymes, undeniable beats, and the always hilarious and appreciated stabs at themselves and others.

OnOne Magazine caught up with O-Doub in early July 2013 to talk a bit about his NGP brothers, some of his views and opinions on the industry, the fans, and what the future may hold.

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OOO:  What is your stance on how to get the public to support ‘live music’ and get out to see the shows?  Any ideas?

O-Doub: – I think that the game has changed in the last few years as far as the over population of basically every genre.  Back in the day when someone was on stage it kind of meant something now anyone with 100 bucks who can sell ten tickets can get a slot almost anywhere.  I feel like it’s up to promoters to have some pride about who they are booking.  As far as getting people to come out to the shows I believe a hard working talented artist who builds their foundation from the ground up should never have a problem filling a room.

OOO: How do you rate your live performance ability?  Do you feel better performing live or in the studio?  What would you like to change or improve?

O-Doub: – I think performing live is one of my strong points actually.  I’m not gonna act like I’m Beyoncé causing a black out at the Super Bowl, but I think when I perform my music I’m confident and it shows.  I love being in the studio but I don’t think much compares to the energy of being on stage performing for people who feel what you’re doing.  If a crowd can match my energy life is good.

OOO: What do you think makes you and your type of music unique from other artists?

O-Doub: – I think I’m just a unique person with my own sense of humor and views on life.  I like to try to keep my music true to who I am so when you hear me you know it’s genuine.  I have a real life, real problems, successes, failures, and everything in the middle.  Of course I like to hit people with clever lines and almost go slapstick comedy on people sometimes but that’s all part of being an artist.  If you told me I had to do the same thing all the time over and over again I would hang it up.  I need to make sure my music stays fresh for myself and the people who support what I do.  I come from an underground background, but I was around people who taught me the value of a “radio record”, so I think I’m well rounded in that aspect.

OOO: Where do you feel hip hop is headed in the future?

O-Doub: – I can’t really say where it’s going to go because it’s always changing. Hip-hop is a fluid situation, but I think that is what makes it exciting.  I’m not the type of person who hates on new artists or new music.  I feel like you have to let shit evolve or it’s going to get stale and as an artist you have to be able to change with the times.  I don’t mean do exactly what people are doing I mean do what you do and still try to be relevant.

OOO: Do you think America is so superficial that the best lyrical artists are suppressed and outsold by ‘generic artists’?

O-Doub: – I don’t think artists get suppressed per say.  I think if an artist makes good music and works hard he/she can build a solid fan base without label help in 2013.  The internet gives people the ability to reach people and that’s really all anyone is trying to do.  If an artist has a big enough buzz labels will come to them.  People must be buying what the labels are selling or the labels wouldn’t fuck with it trust me.  People shouldn’t blame labels for the current state of music; blame the people who support it.

OOO: What image do you think your music conveys and why did you choose this type of image for your music? (We want the fans to really get to know you!)

O-Doub: – I think my image is the real me and it took a long time to get to that point.  I make music according to how I’m feeling at that very moment.  I can feel like making something hard or writing a love song it’s whatever mind state I’m in.  I can write a dance song then in the next breath drop punch lines.  I don’t like being boxed into a corner or forced to make a certain kind of music because in reality fans are just like me and go through all the same shit I do. They go through all the mixed emotions and day to day bullshit that I go through, so they feel it because it’s real.

OOO: Someone once said, “Write what you would want to perform over and over.”  With that said, what song do you love performing?

O-Doub:: – Wow good question, when I was in NGP the song “Chug” would always destroy the crowd so we always did it at every show.  As far as solo songs my favorite song to do would be “Who I am” or “Killen Shit.”

OOO: How do you think you would like to be remembered by everyone if something were to happen to you suddenly?

O-Doub: – I would definitely want people to know that musically I write to inspire people like the people who inspired me.  If I do that or have done that already then my job is done.

OOO: If you only had 5 minutes left on Earth to perform one song that could leave a great impact on the world today, what song would it be

and why would you choose that particular piece?

O-Doub: – I have a song I wrote for my daughter that at this point isn’t even for public consumption.  That would definitely be the song 100%.  Maybe one day I will release it but for now it’s just for her.

OOO: Are there any other ‘behind the scene’ secrets, tips, or additional comments you would like to share with our readers?

O-Doub: -I think the most important thing for anyone who wants anything in life to know is that you have to work hard and not get discouraged by failure.  I think Rocky said it best, “It’s not about how hard you hit, it’s about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward.”

OOO:  Does anyone in particular influence your artistic/ musical talent?

O-Doub: – I think I’m influenced by everyone who came before me and paved the way for me and my team to do what we do.  I also think being around the stable of artists I’m around it builds friendly competition and keeps us all sharp.

  1. Without music, I would be:

I can’t answer that because as far back as I can remember music has been a part of my life in one way or another.

  1. Music is:

A universal language.

  1. My music makes me feel:

Accomplished.

  1. I write the songs because:

It is a way for me to express myself without killing myself or someone else.

  1. Support music because:

If you don’t your favorite artists will be working at McDonalds.

Last but not least I want to thank you for taking the time out to do this interview.  I also want to shout out my whole NGP, Illseed, and Nah Bro Family.

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On his own, O-Doub has been going tough in the studio working on a couple of solo projects; His first solo project, titled “Egomaniac” with former PLR artist Sean Strange in the producers seat along with Little Vic and NGP producer Concept, as well as a mix tape tentatively titled “I’m In My Own Lane” also in the works, both projects expected to hit the streets this upcoming summer.

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